SR-71 Blackbird flat and nonrotating earth

ALL the governments on the face of the earth are controlled by Satan, he has deceived the entire world (Revelation 12:9). Just as it was foretold in the following three passages we now are able to clearly see who the enemy is and his inequities.

"For nothing is secret, that shall not be made manifest; neither any thing hid, that shall not be known and come abroad." Luke 8:17 (KJV)

"But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased." Daniel 12:4 (KJV)

"For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who hold the truth in unrighteousness; Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: Because that, when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened. Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools," Romans 1:18-22 (KJV)

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(1) Dissertations Defended in the Scientific Council of the Institute of Physics of the Earth
Pages: 19, 20
https://www.cia.gov/library/readingroom/docs/CIA-RDP86-00513R001343720008-3.pdf

(2) Propagation of Electromagnetic Fields Over Flat Earth
Pages: Cover Page, 7, 17, 18, 28, 35
https://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2001/ARL-TR-2352.pdf

(3) An Energy Budget Model to Calculate the Low Atmosphere Profiles of Effective Sound Speed at Night
Pages: 10, 16
https://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2003/ARL-MR-563.pdf

(4) Computationally Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Angle of Arrival of Helicopters Using Acoustic Arrays
Pages: 17, 30, 31, 35
https://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2009/ARL-TR-4998.pdf

(5) Adding Liquid Payloads Effects to the 6-DOF Trajectory of Spinning Projectiles
Page: 7
https://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2010/ARL-TR-5118.pdf

(6) Trajectory Prediction of Spin-Stabilized Projectiles With a Steady Liquid Payload
Page: 10
https://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2011/ARL-TR-5810.pdf

(7) Derivation and Definition of a Linear Aircraft Model
Pages: 6, 35, 55, 102
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/pdf/88104main_H-1391.pdf

(8) General Equations of Motion for a Damaged Asymmetric Aircraft
Page: 2
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20070030307.pdf

(9) Predicted Performance of a ThrustEnhanced SR-71 Aircraft with an External Payload
Page: 10
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/pdf/88507main_H-2179.pdf

(10) Derivation of a Point-Mass Aircraft Model used for Fast-Time Simulation
Page: 7
https://www.mitre.org/sites/default/files/publications/pr_15-1318-derivation-of-point-mass-aircraft-model-used-for-fast-time-simulation.pdf

(11) A Method for Reducing The Sensitivity of Optimal Nonlinear Systems to Parameter Uncertainty
Page: 14
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19710018599.pdf

(12) Calculation of Wind Compensation for Launching of Unguided Rockets
Pages: 8, 10
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20040008097.pdf

(13) User’s Manual for LINEAR, a FORTRAN Program to Derive Linear Aircraft Models (2768)
Page: 16
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/pdf/88072main_H-1259.pdf

(14) User’s Manual for LINEAR, a FORTRAN Program to Derive Linear Aircraft Models (2835)
Page: 4
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/pdf/88112main_H-1443.pdf

(15) Determination of Angles of Attack and Sideslip from Radar Data and a Roll-Stablized Platform
Page: 2
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19720012071.pdf

(16) U.S. Standard Atmosphere (1962)
Page: 22
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19630003300.pdf

(17) An Aircraft Model for the AIAA Controls Design Challenge
Page: 13
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/pdf/88248main_H-1777.pdf

(18) Investigation of Aircraft Landing in Variable Wind Fields
Page: 14
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19790005472.pdf

(19) A Mathematical Model of the CH-53
Page: 25
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19810003557.pdf

(20) The Development and Validation of a Piloted Simulation of a Helicopter and External Sling Load
Pages: 6, 37, 48
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19790005912.pdf

(21) Atmospheric Oscillations
Page: 13
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19650015408.pdf

(22) Stability and Control Estimation Flight Test Results for the SR-71 Aircraft With Externally Mounted Experiments
Page: 19
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/pdf/88733main_H-2465.pdf

(23) Flight Testing a V/STOL Aircraft to Identify a Full-Envelope Aerodynamic Model
Page: 9
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19880014378.pdf

(24) Singular Arc Time-Optimal Climb Trajectory of Aircraft in a Two-Dimensional Wind Field
Page: 2
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20060053337.pdf

(25) STUDIES ON INSTABILITIES IN LONG-BASELINE TWO-WAY SATELLITE TIME AND FREQUENCY TRANSFER (TWSTFT) INCLUDING A TROPOSPHERE DELAY MODEL
Pages: 2, 6
https://tycho.usno.navy.mil/ptti/2007papers/paper21.pdf

(26) Scale-Insensitive Detection Algorithm for FLIR Imagery
Page: 6
https://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2001/ARL-TN-175.pdf

(27) User Manual for the Microsoft Window Edition of the Scanning Fast-Field Program (WSCAFFIP) Version 3.0
Page: 45
https://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2003/ARL-TR-2696.pdf

(28) Path-Loss Measurements in a Forested Environment at VHF
Pages: 8, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 23, 25, 26, 35
http://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2000/ARL-TR-2156.pdf

(29) Review of Sound Propagation in the Lower Atmosphere
Page: 18, 208
https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/067880.pdf

(30) Beacon Position and Attitude Navigation Aided by a Magnetometer
Page: 11
https://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2010/ARL-CR-650.pdf

(31) Automatic Target Acquisition of the DEMO III Program
Page: 9
http://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2002/ARL-TR-2683.pdf

(32) Modeling of Atmospheric Effects
Page: 13
https://www.arl.army.mil/arlreports/2000/ARL-TR-1812.pdf

(33) Telemetry Standards
Page: 172
http://www.irig106.org/docs/106-17/106-17_Telemetry_Standards.pdf

(34) Approximate Optimal Guidance for the Advanced Launch System
Page: 172
https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19940020279.pdf

(35) Flight Simulation Software at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center
Pages: 4, 10
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/pdf/88380main_H-2052.pdf

(36) Simulator Aero Model Implementation
Page: 10
https://www.aviationsystemsdivision.arc.nasa.gov/publications/hitl/rtsim/Toms.pdf

(37) Design and Implementation of Flight Visual Simulation System
Page: 3
https://arxiv.org/pdf/1212.0365.pdf

(38) A Discussion of Methods of Real-Time Airplane Flight Simulation
Page: 11
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.510.7499&rep=rep1&type=pdf

(39) The American Practical Navigator: An Epitome of Navigation
Pages: 351, 355, 573, 636
http://geocenter.survey.ntua.gr/main/labs/carto/academic/persons/bnakos_site_nafp/documentation/american_practical_navigator.pdf


Doc #39 on page 11 of 714 states, "The earth is an oblate spheroid (a sphere flattened at the poles)." This statement is in direct contradiction to at least 5 different statements within the document itself:

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Page 351 of 714 states, "This assumes that the observer is at sea level, the earth is flat between observer and object, there is no refraction, and the object and its waterline form a right angle. For most cases of practical significance, these assumption produce no large errors."
1) Waterline, assumes the water has a FLAT line
2) "Earth is Flat between observer and object"

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Page 355 of 714 states, "Curvature of surface _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ = 0.8 foot per nautical mile"
3) If the earth was "flattened at the poles" then this calculation of the curvature is blatantly inaccurate, as the curvature of the surface of the earth would vary.

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Page 574 of 714 states, "back shore, n. That part of a beach which is usually dry, being reached. Only by the highest tides, and by extension, a narrow strip of relatively flat coast boarding the sea. See also FORESHORE."
4) How can the there exist a "flat coast" bordering the sea if the sea curves? It can't.

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Page 636 of 714 states, "line of sight. The straight line between two points, which does not follow the curvature of the earth."
5) If the earth is a globe and curving in every direction downward from the observer, given the definition of "line of sight" it is impossible to achieve "line of sight" for every observation necessitates that it occurs over the "curvature of the earth".


(40) The Production of Firing Tables for Cannon Artillery
Pages: 10, 22, 34, 110
https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/826735.pdf


Doc #40 on pages 66 - 68 of 115 references "Rotation of Earth":
1) Doc #40 does NOT account for curvature of earth
2) Doc #40 represents the "Rotation of Earth" in an equation for "particle theory", whereby, when the numerical value of zero (0) is plugged in for the variable to account for the alleged rotation it does not negatively impact the rest of the equation and it is able to compute.


(41) Field Artillery Manual Cannon Gunnery
Page: 175, 192
https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/pdf/web/tc3_09x81.pdf


I should have done a better analysis on doc #41. Sorry about that, and now here it is. 😁

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Doc #41, "Field Artillery Manual Cannon Gunnery", page 48 of 664:
"3-55. If a round were fired in a vacuum, gravity would cause the projectile to return to the surface of the earth. The path or trajectory of the projectile would be simple to trace. All projectiles, regardless of size, shape, or weight, would follow paths of the same parabolic shape and would achieve the same range for a given muzzle velocity and quadrant elevation."

Nathan Roberts's reply: The "parabolic shape" of the trajectory of the bullet is caused by density, not gravity or the alleged curvature of a spherically shaped earth.
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Doc #41, "Field Artillery Manual Cannon Gunnery", page 48 of 664:
3-57. Gravity causes a projectile in flight to fall to the earth. Because of gravity, the height of the projectile at any instant is less than it would be if no such force were acting on it. In a vacuum, the vertical velocity would decrease from the initial velocity to zero on the ascending branch of the trajectory and increase from zero to the initial velocity on the descending branch, Zero vertical velocity would occur at the summit of
the trajectory. For every vertical velocity value on the upward leg of the ascending branch there is an equal vertical velocity value downward on the descending branch. Since there would be no resistance to the forward motion of the projectile in a vacuum, the horizontal velocity component would be a constant. The acceleration caused by the force of gravity (9.81 m/s) affects only the vertical velocity."

Nathan Roberts's reply: Gravity is an unproven theory, buoyancy is proven. Bullets fall because they are heavier than the medium they are within, that being the air.
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Doc #41, "Field Artillery Manual Cannon Gunnery", page 49 of 664:
"The standard (chart) range is the range opposite a given elevation in the firing tables. It is assumed to have been measured along the surface of a sphere concentric with the earth and passing through the muzzle of a weapon. For all practical purposes, standard range is the horizontal distance from the origin of the trajectory to the level point."

Nathan Roberts's reply: IF "It is assumed to have been measured along the surface of a sphere concentric with the earth", then why in the very next sentence does it state "For all practical purposes, standard range is the horizontal distance from the origin of the trajectory to the level point."
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Doc #41, "Field Artillery Manual Cannon Gunnery", page 51 of 664:
"Deflection effects. Some of the deviations from the standard conditions affecting deflection
are:
* Drift.
* Crosswind.
* Rotation of the earth."

Nathan Roberts's reply: On page 192, "Rotation of the earth" is established as an "unproven theory", which holds zero bearing in reality.
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Doc #41, "Field Artillery Manual Cannon Gunnery", page 132 of 664:
5-36. The third condition is valid met corrections considered by each of the firing platoons. This includes the met message valid for the firing platoon, propellant temperature, projectile weight, vertical interval, and corrections for earth rotation.

Nathan Roberts's reply: On page 192, "Rotation of the earth" is established as an "unproven theory", which holds zero bearing in reality.
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Doc #41, "Field Artillery Manual Cannon Gunnery", page 186 of 664:
"Range (Column 1). This is the distance measured from the muzzle to the target on the surface of a sphere concentric with the earth. When chart range is used as the entry argument for this table, it is expressed to the nearest 10 meters and interpolation is necessary."

Nathan Roberts's reply: The same response given to "sphere concentric with earth" mentioned on page 49 applies here too.


(42) Field Artillery Gunnery
http://militarynewbie.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/FM-3-09.8-FIELD-ARTILLERY-GUNNERY.pdf

(43) TTP for the Field Artillery Cannon Gunnery
https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/usmc/mcwp/3-16-3/mcwp3-16-3.pdf

(44) Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for the field artillery Manual Cannon Gunnery
https://www.marines.mil/Portals/1/Publications/mcwp3_16_4.pdf

Thank you to Pastor Dean Odle for doing the initial research and passing it along to me!